Friday, 11 September 2015

9/11 - a reflective memorial....

14 years ago the world that we lived in changed forever when at 8.46am a hijacked plane flew into
the north tower of the world trade centre in New York, this was followed at 9.03 with another plane being flown into the South Tower. 2 further planes on course for Washington were flown into the Pentagon and one bought down in Pennsylvania. 2,753 people lost their life on that day.
I have very special memories of the world trade centre and have visited every time that I have been in New York over the past 20 years and blogged many times about it.
Last year when visiting New York I spent some time at the newly opened 9/11 memorial museum. I had previously visited the memorial pools and been completely humbled by the space and names engraved around the garden. I had mixed feelings on the museum, but so glad that I have been. It isn't easy viewing and its something that will stay with me forever, but a beautiful tribute to those that lost their life on that day, and have lost their lives since.
The museum is largely underground at the original foundation levels of the trade centre towers, but due to the atrium spaces its filled with light and space. A vast amount of the museum photography is prohibited out of respect to those that lost their life and their families and loved ones.
Along with a large amount of visual reminders from that day; including personal affects from the victims, their is also audio, messages left for loved ones, 9/11 calls and TV & audio footage from the day as the events unfolded.
The museum houses 3 exhibitions, historical, memorial, and foundation.
The historical charts the events of the day and how the history of the structures.
The memorial is a space that houses a large number of personal belongings and a room of photographs of each victim which allow you to get to know about each through conversations with loved ones.
The Foundation Hall is a room of massive scale and soaring height. A surviving retaining wall of the original World Trade Center is presented as a testament to survival and determination. Against this backdrop the "Last Column," stands 36-feet high and is covered with mementos, memorial inscriptions, and missing posters placed there by ironworkers, rescue workers and others. Removed during a ceremony to mark the close of the recovery effort at Ground Zero, the column, laid prone, was draped with an American flag and escorted by honor guard. Standing tall once again, the Last Column will encourage reflection on the foundations of resilience, hope, and community.
Outside standing tall and proud overlooking the memorial pools and museum is the new One World Trade which was completed in 2014. This stunning building has opened to visitors in 2015 and I look forward to visiting when I am in New York in December later this year.
This is a humbling, reflective beautiful space, which honours the lives lost with dignity, understanding and elegance. 
I visited the site very early in the morning and the museum at 9am, a time where the space is relatively quiet. Due to the booking regulations the area doesn't ever feel like a tourist trap/mausoleum and is managed and co-ordinated well with vigilant security checks and large bags have to be stored.
To understand how New York has evolved over the last 14 years, this area is a must visit. It shows how the shape and feel of the city changed completely on that day and remembers each and every person with a dignified memorial.
So on this day 14 years on I pause and remember those that lost their life on that day and to all those lives lost since.


1 comment:

Caroline said...

Lovely post, Teresa - thoughtful, interesting and well written. Thanks so much for sharing x

Friday, 11 September 2015

9/11 - a reflective memorial....

14 years ago the world that we lived in changed forever when at 8.46am a hijacked plane flew into
the north tower of the world trade centre in New York, this was followed at 9.03 with another plane being flown into the South Tower. 2 further planes on course for Washington were flown into the Pentagon and one bought down in Pennsylvania. 2,753 people lost their life on that day.
I have very special memories of the world trade centre and have visited every time that I have been in New York over the past 20 years and blogged many times about it.
Last year when visiting New York I spent some time at the newly opened 9/11 memorial museum. I had previously visited the memorial pools and been completely humbled by the space and names engraved around the garden. I had mixed feelings on the museum, but so glad that I have been. It isn't easy viewing and its something that will stay with me forever, but a beautiful tribute to those that lost their life on that day, and have lost their lives since.
The museum is largely underground at the original foundation levels of the trade centre towers, but due to the atrium spaces its filled with light and space. A vast amount of the museum photography is prohibited out of respect to those that lost their life and their families and loved ones.
Along with a large amount of visual reminders from that day; including personal affects from the victims, their is also audio, messages left for loved ones, 9/11 calls and TV & audio footage from the day as the events unfolded.
The museum houses 3 exhibitions, historical, memorial, and foundation.
The historical charts the events of the day and how the history of the structures.
The memorial is a space that houses a large number of personal belongings and a room of photographs of each victim which allow you to get to know about each through conversations with loved ones.
The Foundation Hall is a room of massive scale and soaring height. A surviving retaining wall of the original World Trade Center is presented as a testament to survival and determination. Against this backdrop the "Last Column," stands 36-feet high and is covered with mementos, memorial inscriptions, and missing posters placed there by ironworkers, rescue workers and others. Removed during a ceremony to mark the close of the recovery effort at Ground Zero, the column, laid prone, was draped with an American flag and escorted by honor guard. Standing tall once again, the Last Column will encourage reflection on the foundations of resilience, hope, and community.
Outside standing tall and proud overlooking the memorial pools and museum is the new One World Trade which was completed in 2014. This stunning building has opened to visitors in 2015 and I look forward to visiting when I am in New York in December later this year.
This is a humbling, reflective beautiful space, which honours the lives lost with dignity, understanding and elegance. 
I visited the site very early in the morning and the museum at 9am, a time where the space is relatively quiet. Due to the booking regulations the area doesn't ever feel like a tourist trap/mausoleum and is managed and co-ordinated well with vigilant security checks and large bags have to be stored.
To understand how New York has evolved over the last 14 years, this area is a must visit. It shows how the shape and feel of the city changed completely on that day and remembers each and every person with a dignified memorial.
So on this day 14 years on I pause and remember those that lost their life on that day and to all those lives lost since.


1 comment:

Caroline said...

Lovely post, Teresa - thoughtful, interesting and well written. Thanks so much for sharing x